Category Archives: Growing

Spring Seed Swap Startup

Don’t miss this event!

Spring Seed Swap Startup
Sunday, May 3 from noon to 5 pm
Apple Farm Village
14525 148th Ave. NE, Woodinville
Gardeners, join with us as we start up the Sammamish Valley Seed Swap.
squash seed in hand
squash seed in hand

Try a new vegetable or flower variety. Find a home for your extra seeds or plant starts. Hang out with us and other gardeners to swap and talk about plant varieties and seed saving. We hope this Startup event will grow into a community.

We will have seed for you to take home to your garden. If you have extra seed, bring it along to share with other gardeners. If you have plant starts or cuttings to share, bring them too. Maybe they will find a new home.
We will have seeds available to take home.
We welcome people to trade or donate seeds, small plants, bulbs, or tubers..
        We welcome excess seed purchased by gardeners.
        We especially encourage seeds saved by gardeners.
Some rules:
    No GMO seed or plants.
    No treated seed.
    No seeds from the Noxious Weed list.
    Plants and plant material must be disease-free, healthy, and in good condition.
    Seed and plant material must be clearly labeled.
    Trades and donations only. No seeds are to be bought or sold.
Dr. Maze’s Farm and The Herbfarm are seed sponsors, donating seed to get things going. Apple Farm Village, the host sponsor, has shops, art, and wine tastings to distract you from the seeds.
The Seed Swap is part of the Sammamish Valley Spring Celebration (SammamishValley.org). There are nine additional farms and other stops participating in the Sammamish Valley Spring Celebration, so plan to spend some time exploring the valley. We hope to see you there!

Starting the new year with a tumble.

It has been some time since I have written here. I have been on a long recovery from a severe back injury. I am now working to catch up and get a new year started once again.

For those of you who are wondering, falling down a flight of concrete stairs and fracturing your spine is an experience that I highly recommend that you strenuously avoid. It is now more than eleven weeks since my accident. I still have a month or more before I can expect to be functioning as usual. The good news is that I do expect to heal and get fully back into farming. I will just be a little shorter than I was last year.

I have had help with the animals from some wonderful volunteers. And I would still be lying on my back without the non-stop support and aid of my wife Carol.

Winter Squash seedlings - Carnival
Winter Squash seedlings – Carnival

Our field crew is back at the farm and has started preparing the ground for planting. The greenhouse is starting to fill with flats of seeds starting to sprout.

As part of my strategy to successfully reach the end of the farm year, we will be reducing our hours during the summer.

We will open the middle two weekends in July for our Lavender Celebration, (July 10, 11, 12 and 17, 18, 19), the first three Saturdays of September (September 5,12,19) as Early Bird days for the Sunflower – Corn Maze, and then every day from Friday September 24 to Saturday October 31 for our big Pumpkin Patch and Maze Fall Harvest Celebration.

I thank you for your support over the years. I hope to see you down on the farm again this year.

Farm & Field: September & October

We work all hard year round to prepare the farm for our big season, September and October. On the farm in September we are concentrating on harvesting winter squash and gourds, starting to prepare the fields for winter, and gearing up for pumpkin season.

Strolling through the Maze
Strolling through the Maze

September usually has better weather as Summer transitions into Fall. The maze paths are dry and the big sunflowers are at their peak. Even so, October has the force of tradition that keeps people waiting for their farm visits.

This is a bit of a retrospective look back at some of the highlights of September and October at Dr. Maze’s Farm.

In September we prepare for the big Pumpkin Patch season. We start selling the Jack o  Lantern pumpkins the last week of September for the early bird Halloween celebrants. Continue reading Farm & Field: September & October

Farm and Field Today: August

August is a transitional month here at the farm. The planting is done and we are starting to focus on our big fall season. The days are long and hot, but our minds are looking ahead to October, when most of our visitors come to the farm. In addition to the fall Pumpkin Patch, Corn Maze, and other fall activities, we also greet quite a few kids and teachers to our Pumpkin Farm Tours.

I am writing this in January instead of late August as I intended. Although I took the photographs, I somehow never found the time to write this up. Here is a bit of what happened on the farm in August.

Theodora & Lucy - Angora goats
Theodora & Lucy – Angora goats

We expanded our little herd with two Angora goats, Theodora and Lucy. Yes, these are goat and not sheep. And yes, these are the animals that produce the luxurious Angora wool. Continue reading Farm and Field Today: August

Farm and Field Today: July Edition

This is the first of a new series of articles where I give an update on what is going on at the farm. With one exception, I took all of these photos today (July 3).

Every day the plants are bigger and I find new things to see. Our crops are all planted and now we are focusing on weeding and on preparing for the upcoming Lavender Celebration weekends (July 11-13 and 18-20).

Flower of a large gourd.
Flower of a large gourd.

The vining crops are starting to blossom. We see flowers in the pie pumpkins, Jack O Lanterns, gourds, and the winter squash fields.  Most of these have bright yellow-orange flowers, but the big hard gourds are have these beautiful frilly white flowers. Continue reading Farm and Field Today: July Edition

Seedling Season

It is Seedling Season here on the farm.  The starts house is filling up with trays of tiny, growing plants that will soon be planted out into our fields.

ordering seeds
Ordering seeds

At the turn of the year I gather up all the new seed catalogs and chose the crop varieties I want for the year. I consider what grew well, what sold well, how to mix things up so any one failure would be balanced by another success, and what strrikes my fancy. Looking at my records of what we grew in the past years, I make the decisions on what to grow and how many of each.

Continue reading Seedling Season